memory and perception

Loneliness ‘Epidemic’ May Reflect Population Demographics

Loneliness ‘Epidemic’ May Reflect Population Demographics

Two new studies rebut claims that Americans are in the midst of a “loneliness epidemic,” with scientists finding older people today may not be any lonelier than their counterparts from...
Playing Sports Can Tune The Brain to Pick Up External Sounds Better

Playing Sports Can Tune The Brain to Pick Up External Sounds Better

New research finds that college athletes have an enhanced ability to filter out background electrical “noise” in the brain to better process external sounds. Northwestern University investigators say
Brain Injury Among Homeless May Be At Least 4 Times That of General Population

Brain Injury Among Homeless May Be At Least 4 Times That of General Population

The homeless population has a disproportionately high lifetime prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to a new study led by the University of British Columbia (UBC). TBI can range...
Bullying Can Undermine Mental Health of Both Parties

Bullying Can Undermine Mental Health of Both Parties

New research suggests there is a two-way relationship between bullying perpetration and mental health problems among youth in the United States. Investigators discovered that bullying perpetration
Long-Distance Skiers Have Less Depression and Vascular Dementia, But Not Alzheimer’s

Long-Distance Skiers Have Less Depression and Vascular Dementia, But Not Alzheimer’s

In a new Swedish study, researchers compared 200,000 people who had participated in a long-distance cross-country ski race between 1989 and 2010 with a matched control group from the general...
Inflammation Linked to the ‘Brain Fog’ of Chronic Illness

Inflammation Linked to the ‘Brain Fog’ of Chronic Illness

A new study published in the journal Neuroimage shows that inflammation may be responsible for the mental sluggishness that often accompanies illness. Many people who struggle with chronic illness
Aerobic Exercise, Heart-Healthy Diet May Ward Off Memory Issues

Aerobic Exercise, Heart-Healthy Diet May Ward Off Memory Issues

A new study suggests that a six-month aerobic exercise regimen and heart-healthy diet improves one’s ability to think, remember and make decisions, and may ward off mild cognitive impairment, or...
‘Feeling Loved’ Shown to Impact Well-Being

‘Feeling Loved’ Shown to Impact Well-Being

New research suggests the perception of brief feelings of love throughout the day appear to be associated with an individual’s psychological well-being. Pennsylvania State University scientists
Illiterate People May Be Three Times More Likely to Develop Dementia

Illiterate People May Be Three Times More Likely to Develop Dementia

Those who are illiterate may have nearly three times greater risk of developing dementia than people who can read and write, according to a new study published in the journal...
Brain Stimulation Can Aid Practice of Mindfulness Meditation

Brain Stimulation Can Aid Practice of Mindfulness Meditation

Many believe our contemporary society is a haven for burnout. Perhaps as an offshoot of the information age or just an expansion of cultural change in the 21st century, many...
New Study: Mental Illness Not Predictive of Crime or Incarceration

New Study: Mental Illness Not Predictive of Crime or Incarceration

A new study challenges the belief that those diagnosed with mental illness are of greater danger to the public-at-large. This issue has become prominent as policy makers seek to develop...
Teen Girls Increasingly Report Feeling Bored

Teen Girls Increasingly Report Feeling Bored

“I’m bored,” is a typical complaint by teens in every era, one that’s growing more common for U.S. adolescents, especially girls. Washington State University researchers have found complaints of
Yoga or PT Shown to Improve Back Pain and Sleep

Yoga or PT Shown to Improve Back Pain and Sleep

A new randomized controlled study suggests yoga and physical therapy (PT) are effective approaches to treat co-occurring sleep disturbances and back pain, thus reducing the need for medication.
Less Binge Drinking Among Teens, Yet More Depression

Less Binge Drinking Among Teens, Yet More Depression

Researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health said for the first time in the past 40 years, binge drinking and depressive symptoms among adolescents are no longer linked....
Many Older Adults Fear Dementia But Few Discuss Prevention With MD

Many Older Adults Fear Dementia But Few Discuss Prevention With MD

Nearly half of Americans in midlife think they’re likely to develop dementia, but only 5 percent have actually talked with a doctor about what they could do to reduce their...
Cannabis May Help Reduce PTSD-Related Depression, Suicide

Cannabis May Help Reduce PTSD-Related Depression, Suicide

A new analysis of health survey data from more than 24,000 Canadians, suggests cannabis may be helping residents cope with the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Researchers found
Fitness May Be Best Medicine to Prevent Dementia

Fitness May Be Best Medicine to Prevent Dementia

A new Norwegian study of older individuals suggests high fitness levels or improving fitness capacity over time allows a person to live longer without dementia. Dementia involves a progressive
Yoga, Breathing Exercise Can Ease Depression and Anxiety Now And In Months Ahead

Yoga, Breathing Exercise Can Ease Depression and Anxiety Now And In Months Ahead

A variety of scientific studies have supported yoga practice as a means to ease depression and anxiety. Now, a new study out of Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) provides...
Canadian Study: Poor Nutrition May Hike Risk for Depression

Canadian Study: Poor Nutrition May Hike Risk for Depression

New research suggests one’s diet can increase the risk of depression. Investigators also discovered the likelihood of depression is higher among middle-aged and older women immigrants to Canada.
Brief Meditation Can Alter Brain Activity Tied to Increased Error Recognition

Brief Meditation Can Alter Brain Activity Tied to Increased Error Recognition

Non-meditators who engage in just one 20-minute session of “open monitoring meditation” show changes in brain activity suggesting increased error recognition, according to a new EEG study at Michigan