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Exclusive: Makers of ‘HowStuffWorks’ Debut Podcast About U.S. Political Divide

Exclusive: Makers of ‘HowStuffWorks’ Debut Podcast About U.S. Political Divide

They also interviewed a man who lived like a goat for a year.
Exclusive: Makers of ‘HowStuffWorks’ Debut Podcast About U.S. Political Divide

Exclusive: Makers of ‘HowStuffWorks’ Debut Podcast About U.S. Political Divide

They also interviewed a man who lived like a goat for a year.
Wharram Percy Versus The Undead

Wharram Percy Versus The Undead

Humanity has always had a fascination with -- and fear of -- the dead. And when the small medieval village of Wharram Percy felt they might become victims of the undead, they took drastic, grisly
The Sordid, Secret World of Televangelists and Megachurches

The Sordid, Secret World of Televangelists and Megachurches

What if believing in success became the same thing as succeeding? Religious figures around the world encourage their followers to equate financial donations with future material gains. Join Ben, Matt
How White America Tried To Destroy Chinese Restaurants

How White America Tried To Destroy Chinese Restaurants

Today Chinese restaurants serve some of the most popular cuisine in the United States, with more than 41,000 restaurants scattered around the country. Yet in the 1900s these restaurants were so
X-Rays, Songs and Soviets: The Stilyagi Story

X-Rays, Songs and Soviets: The Stilyagi Story

Caught between the conflicting ideologies of the Cold War, Soviet teens were banned from collecting Western music -- smuggled records could be both rare and expensive. The solution? Discarded X-rays,
Did a real-life rainmaker almost drown San Diego?

Did a real-life rainmaker almost drown San Diego?

Charles Mallory Hatfield considered himself a real-life rainmaker (or, as he preferred to describe himself, a 'moisture accelerator') and, when San Diego faced one of its most damaging droughts,
Does the US Confederacy still exist in Americana, Brazil?

Does the US Confederacy still exist in Americana, Brazil?

At the close the US Civil War, tens of thousands of former Confederate families fled the US for a small city in Brazil, where they sought to continue living as they had in the days before the war.
When (and why) did the US start calling its citizens consumers?

When (and why) did the US start calling its citizens consumers?

Today, the terms "citizen" and "consumer" are often used interchangeably by authors, journalists and politicians. To some experts, this shift has disturbing implications. But how important is a word?
Nazis, Churchill and Chocolate

Nazis, Churchill and Chocolate

When Lord Victor Rothschild first heard the news, he was incredulous -- surely Nazi Germany wasn't seriously planning to assassinate Winston Churchill with an exploding chocolate bar. However,
When People Thought They Were Made of Glass

When People Thought They Were Made of Glass

In 1422, King Charles VI died after ruling France for more than 40 years. He was also remembered as Charles the Mad, in part because he was convinced that his body was made of glass and would shatter
Why Are Leaf Blowers So Irritating?

Why Are Leaf Blowers So Irritating?

If the sound of leaf blowers makes you angry, you're not alone -- and there's science behind why.
What Is (and Isn't) Terrorism?

What Is (and Isn't) Terrorism?

When is -- and isn't -- a crime considered terrorism? The legal, political and moral definitions are often at odds. We explore why on BrainStuff.
Do Monkeys Have Superstitions?

Do Monkeys Have Superstitions?

We share a lot in common with monkeys, but are they just as superstitious? And could the belief in winning streaks carry an evolutionary advantage?
When Scientists Hid Under Beds To Spy On Kids

When Scientists Hid Under Beds To Spy On Kids

Let's say you're a scientist -- how far would you go to carry out a study? Back in the 1930s, two intrepid researchers went into full spy mode, stalking college students in an effort to determine how
How Does Salt Prevent Food Spoilage?

How Does Salt Prevent Food Spoilage?

Salt has kept entire civilizations alive thanks to its abilities to preserve food and protect it from harmful germs. But how?
Conquest via Bird Poop: One Island at a Time

Conquest via Bird Poop: One Island at a Time

If you land on a deserted island, you might be tempted to search for the basic stuff first -- food, water, shelter, and so on -- but don't forget to keep an eye out for guano! Why, you ask? Well, due
Why Do We Find Symmetry So Pleasing?

Why Do We Find Symmetry So Pleasing?

What is it about the arrangement of petals on a flower or a perfectly symmetrical display of soup cans that catches our eye? Our brains seem wired for it, but why?