ecology

Scientists make fresh call for policy makers to protect pollinators

Pollinating insects could thrive if improvements are made to agri-environment schemes across Europe, according to a new collaborative study involving scientists from Trinity.

Amazon forest disturbance is changing how plants are dispersed

The study looked at areas in the Brazilian Amazon with varying levels of disturbance from activities like logging or burning. The researchers found that not only did human disturbance reduce overall

Freshwater insects recover while spiders decline in UK

Many insects, mosses and lichens in the UK are bucking the trend of biodiversity loss, according to a comprehensive analysis of over 5,000 species led by UCL and the UK Centre for Ecology &

Plastic pollution poses new threat to a turtle paradise

These are turbulent times for turtles.

How learning about fish can help us save the Amazon rainforest

Think of the Amazon, and you probably think of jaguars, monkeys, or parrots. But many of the rainforest's secrets can be found hidden in its watery depths, from the fish swimming around its rivers and

Invasive bug found feeding on avocado plants in Hawaii

An invasive bug was discovered feeding on avocado leaves across the state of Hawaii and was most recently found on Maui plants in retail outlets, entomologists said.

Polestar’s Using Recycled Materials In Its Interiors To Save The Planet

Polestar will use 3D-knit fabrics made from 100% recycled PET bottles, among other solutions. |

To help wildlife move, researchers map both natural and legal boundaries

Wildlife need to move to survive: to find food, reproduce and escape wildfires and other hazards. Yet as soon as they leave protected areas like national forests or parks, they often wind up on a

Research reveals unique reproductive trait for seagrass

Seagrasses have long been known as some of Earth's most remarkable organisms—descendants of flowering land plants that have re-colonized the ocean by developing traits that allow them to grow,

Tourists pose continued risks for disease transmission to endangered mountain gorillas

Researchers at Ohio University have published a new study in collaboration with Ugandan scientists, cautioning that humans place endangered mountain gorillas at risk of disease transmission during

Forests bouncing back from beetles, but elk and deer slowing recovery

Two words, and a tiny little creature, strike fear in the hearts of many Colorado outdoor enthusiasts: bark beetle. But new research from University of Colorado Boulder reveals that even simultaneous

Caribbean sharks in need of large marine protected areas

Governments must provide larger spatial protections in the Greater Caribbean for threatened, highly migratory species such as sharks, is the call from a diverse group of marine scientists including

Taking a bite out of mosquito-borne disease

It has long been the dream of infectious disease researchers around the world to create a safe, non-toxic way to kill mosquitoes.

Protecting redundancy in the food web helps ensure ecological resilience

In 2014, a disease of epidemic proportions gripped the West Coast of the U.S. You may not have noticed, though, unless you were underwater.

One-third of plant and animal species could be gone in 50 years, study says

Accurately predicting biodiversity loss from climate change requires a detailed understanding of what aspects of climate change cause extinctions, and what mechanisms may allow species to survive.

New technique reduces pathogen identification time from two weeks to less than one hour

Transmitted by insects, especially the aster leafhopper, aster yellows (AY) outbreaks can cause severe production losses in many crops, including carrots, lettuce, and canola. Canola is a
These Crows Evolved Into a New Species, Boned the Old Species Too Much, Now Back Where They Started

These Crows Evolved Into a New Species, Boned the Old Species Too Much, Now Back Where They Started

Hundreds of thousands of years ago, a glacier advanced upon the Pacific Northwest, its ice forming a natural barrier that fractured crows into two populations. These populations began to diverge into
These Crows Evolved Into a New Species, Boned the Old Species Too Much, Now Back Where They Started

These Crows Evolved Into a New Species, Boned the Old Species Too Much, Now Back Where They Started

Hundreds of thousands of years ago, a glacier advanced upon the Pacific Northwest, its ice forming a natural barrier that fractured crows into two populations. These populations began to diverge into

Beloved Colombian hippos pose environmental dilemma

At dusk, the street lights flicker on around a city park, located not far from the Magdalena River in Colombia. An enormous figure emerges from the shadows. It lumbers forward, stopping to graze on

How to reduce the number of birds killed by buildings

As high-rise cities grow upwards and outwards, increasing numbers of birds die by crashing into glass buildings each year. And of course many others break beaks, wings and legs or suffer other