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classical music

Leo Beranek, Acoustics Designer and Internet Pioneer, Dies at 102

Leo Beranek, Acoustics Designer and Internet Pioneer, Dies at 102

Leo L. Beranek in Symphony Hall in Boston in 2003. An expert in acoustics, he improved the sound in several concert venues.
When It Comes to Success, Age Really Is Just a Number

When It Comes to Success, Age Really Is Just a Number

Mozart, Marie Curie and Einstein were all successful before age 30. Researchers have found that many career scientists were more likely to produce “impact” papers earlier rather than later, but that
When It Comes to Success, Age Really Is Just a Number

When It Comes to Success, Age Really Is Just a Number

Mozart, Marie Curie and Einstein were all successful before age 30. Researchers have found that many career scientists were more likely to produce “impact” papers earlier rather than later, but that
When It Comes to Success, Age Really Is Just a Number

When It Comes to Success, Age Really Is Just a Number

Mozart, Marie Curie and Einstein were all successful before age 30. Researchers have found that many career scientists were more likely to produce “impact” papers earlier rather than later, but that
The Saturday Profile: Opera Maestro Ensnared in Brazilian Graft Scandal Lashes Out at Accusers

The Saturday Profile: Opera Maestro Ensnared in Brazilian Graft Scandal Lashes Out at Accusers

The Brazilian conductor and artistic director John Neschling, left, with two of his advisers in São Paulo. He says lawbreakers are smearing him to get leniency through plea deals.
Mark Taimanov, World-Class Chess and Piano Player, Dies at 90

Mark Taimanov, World-Class Chess and Piano Player, Dies at 90

Mark Taimanov playing in the quarterfinals of a 1971 chess tournament, which he lost to Bobby Fischer, who was at his height.

The Visual Artists Who Inspired Brahms

Amid the cultural turmoil of late-nineteenth-century Europe—driven, most powerfully, by the revolutionary operas of Richard Wagner—Johannes Brahms continued to explore the early-nineteenth-century
Retiring: Warning to Retirees Who Take Up Music: The Cat May Flee the Room

Retiring: Warning to Retirees Who Take Up Music: The Cat May Flee the Room

Lois Owen plays the piano for a group singalong at the Forest at Duke in Durham, N.C.
Retiring: Warning to Retirees Who Take Up Music: The Cat May Flee the Room

Retiring: Warning to Retirees Who Take Up Music: The Cat May Flee the Room

Lois Owen plays the piano for a group singalong at the Forest at Duke in Durham, N.C.

Breaking Elgar’s Enigma

Bob Padgett used to work for large insurance companies in northern California, assessing property damage from fires and floods. But he was also a talented classical violinist, and he would moonlight
An Orchestra Triumphs Over Trump’s Travel Ban

An Orchestra Triumphs Over Trump’s Travel Ban

Ivan Fischer conducting a rehearsal of the Budapest Festival Orchestra.
Milan Journal: In the Land of Opera, a Choir for the Tone Deaf

Milan Journal: In the Land of Opera, a Choir for the Tone Deaf

Students training their voices with Coro degli Stonati, or choir for the tone deaf, in Milan.

Andris Nelsons’s New-Music Bona Fides

Andris Nelsons, the Latvian conductor who is in his third season as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, has been justly criticized—along with Yannick Nézet-Séguin and Jaap van Zweden, the

Spring Classical Music Preview

You would have to go back to Eleanor Steber—Mozart’s Countess, Barber’s Vanessa—to find an American soprano who combines refulgent vocal tone with innovative repertoire as splendidly as Renée Fleming.

A Complex Concerto for Yo-Yo Ma

The other day, the composer and conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen sat in a sparsely decorated office in West Los Angeles, eying the score of his new cello concerto, which Yo-Yo Ma, Alan Gilbert, and the New
A New York Philharmonic Coup: Deborah Borda Is Named the New Leader

A New York Philharmonic Coup: Deborah Borda Is Named the New Leader

Deborah Borda with, from left, the New York Philharmonic’s chief operating officer, Bill Thomas; its chairman, Oscar S. Schafer; and its next music director, Jaap van Zweden.

Steve Reich’s Celebration of the Lineage of Minimalism

The musical style so loosely called minimalism—or, in Philip Glass’s preferred term, “music with repetitive structures”—is not an exclusively American product. There have long been foreign

Classical-Music Venues, Hiding in Plain Sight

Classical-music presenters are placing big bets on new venues, such as Williamsburg’s dynamic National Sawdust. But some of the most evocative spaces may be hiding in plain sight—take the Church of

“Der Rosenkavalier,” in Its Era of Composition

When the novelist Robert Musil, on the first page of “The Man Without Qualities,” placidly launched his Viennese epic on “a fine August day in the year 1913,” he was indulging in the deepest irony: a

New York Celebrates a Composer Who Left Town

“Cherish, conserve, consider, create”: you could do worse than to live your life according to the principles propounded by the composer Lou Harrison, who would have been a hundred in May. He died in