Watch your step: why the 10,000 daily goal is built on bad science

Photo of Watch your step: why the 10,000 daily goal is built on bad science
Facebook
VKontakte
share_fav

An entire industry has been built on the claim that 10,000 steps a day were necessary to be healthy. But where did the figure come from?

In recent years, the 10,000-steps-a-day regime has become entrenched in popular culture. You can barely walk down the street without someone stomping past you wearing a FitBit; when Jeremy Hunt was health secretary, he was often pictured with his poking out from his shirtsleeves. It has become a global obsession: the research firm Gartner recently estimated that by 2020 there will be 500m wearables adorning consumers across the world.

This is all despite the fact that 10,000 steps is a completely arbitrary figure, one that originates from a successful Japanese marketing campaign in the mid-60s. In an attempt to capitalise on the immense popularity of the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, the company Yamasa designed the world’s first wearable step-counter, a device called a manpo-kei, which translates as “10,000-step meter”.

Continue reading...
view The Guardian: World News
#health wellbeing
#fitness