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The Atlantic: National

Why You Never See Your Friends Anymore

Why You Never See Your Friends Anymore

Just under a century ago, the Soviet Union embarked on one of the strangest attempts to reshape the common calendar that has ever been undertaken. As Joseph Stalin raced to turn an agricultural
When GoFundMe Gets Ugly

When GoFundMe Gets Ugly

In June 2016, Chauncy Black rode the bus from his home in South Memphis to one of the city’s whiter, wealthier neighborhoods. The 16-year-old helped his grandmother pay the bills by doing odd jobs for

What Happens When Your Town Dries Up?

California’s Central Valley is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the United States—it yields a third of the produce grown in the country and is the world’s largest supplier of canned

He’s Evangelical. He’s Progressive. And He Wants Your Vote.

“I’m running as a Republican because I am a Republican,” says Robb Ryerse in the short documentary True Believer. Confusion, though, is understandable—Ryerse, who ran for the Republican House seat in

How Black Americans Were Robbed of Their Land

Over the course of the 20th century, black Americans have lost approximately 12 million acres of land. This mass land dispossession—a war waged by deed of title, which has affected 98 percent of black
Has the Presidency Skipped Gen X?

Has the Presidency Skipped Gen X?

Oliver MundayFor almost 60 years, two generations have held the American presidency. The Greatest Generation—born in the early 20th century—first won the White House in 1960, when John F. Kennedy was

Where the Towers Fell

Memorials are multidimensional, dichotomous spaces. They exist somewhere between presence and memory. They are built for the collective and for those personally affected. They are places for
Medicaid’s Dark Secret

Medicaid’s Dark Secret

Images above: Tawanda Rhodes believed she would inherit the home her parents had bought in Boston’s Dorchester neighborhood in 1979. Then she received a letter from her state’s Medicaid program. The

What Happened to Wilson?

“I was home when I saw two vans pull up. They opened the van, and out came the kids. They were all walking in a line. I don’t know what’s actually going on in there. I hope they’re okay.” When a
What I Wish I’d Known About Sexual Assault in the Military

What I Wish I’d Known About Sexual Assault in the Military

“Duck and cover!” a mechanized voice screamed. The ground shook and the window rattled. I rolled from my bed to the floor of my trailer and felt for the armor I’d forgotten in my office. I lay there
The End of the Roman Empire Wasn’t That Bad

The End of the Roman Empire Wasn’t That Bad

Hanna BarczykIt’s time to think about the Roman empire again. But not the part of its history that usually commands attention in the United States: the long, sad path of Decline and Fall. It’s what
On Trump and Queeg: A Follow-up

On Trump and Queeg: A Follow-up

Three days ago I argued that if Donald Trump were in any consequential job other than the one he now occupies—surgeon, military commander, head of a private organization or public company, airline

He Fought for Migrant Kids. Then He Got Rich.

Growing up in Brownsville, Texas, the southernmost city along the U.S.-Mexico border, Juan Sanchez was always immersed in migrant life. He went on to build a career as an advocate, founding what is
Photos: The Statue of Liberty, Mother of Exiles

Photos: The Statue of Liberty, Mother of Exiles

Gary Hershorn / Getty The 151-foot-tall Statue of Liberty, officially Liberty Enlightening the World, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and Gustave Eiffel, was a gift to the United States from
Photos of Woodstock 1969, on Its 50th Anniversary

Photos of Woodstock 1969, on Its 50th Anniversary

John Dominis / The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Fifty years ago, more than 400,000 people descended on Bethel, New York, headed to a dairy farm owned by Max and Miriam Yasgur, where the
The Great Land Robbery

The Great Land Robbery

Images above: A sign on a utility pole to deter hunters, near the old Scott-family homestead, Drew, Mississippi; Willena's brother Isaac Daniel Scott Sr. amid soybeans in Mound Bayou. I. Wiped Out“You
How Economists’ Faith in Markets Broke America

How Economists’ Faith in Markets Broke America

A little more than a generation ago, a stealthy revolution swept America. It was a dual changing of the guard: Two tribes, two attitudes, two approaches to a good society were simultaneously displaced
How a City Talks About Itself: Sioux Falls

How a City Talks About Itself: Sioux Falls

In June 2013, my husband, Jim, and I first landed our small, single-engine Cirrus propeller airplane at the main airport, Joe Foss Field, in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.It was the first stop on our
Opening Day at Disneyland: Photos From 1955

Opening Day at Disneyland: Photos From 1955

Allan Grant / The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty During the week of July 17, 1955, Walt Disney’s new theme park, named “Disneyland,” opened to the public in Anaheim, California. The 17th, a

Jim Crow’s Last Stand

The legacy of Jim Crow continues to loom large in the United States. But nowhere is it arguably more evident than in Louisiana. In 1898, a constitutional convention successfully codified a slew of Jim