The New York Times: Technology: news on page 8

California Blackouts Hit Cellphone Service, Fraying a Lifeline

California Blackouts Hit Cellphone Service, Fraying a Lifeline

As power is cut to reduce the wildfire risk from electrical wires and towers, a primary source of emergency communication is put in jeopardy.
Google, in Rare Stumble, Posts 23% Decline in Profit

Google, in Rare Stumble, Posts 23% Decline in Profit

Alphabet, Google’s parent, said its profits fell after a sharp increase in spending for research and development.
Dissent Erupts at Facebook Over Hands-Off Stance on Political Ads

Dissent Erupts at Facebook Over Hands-Off Stance on Political Ads

In an open letter, the social network’s employees said letting politicians post false claims in ads was “a threat” to the company.
F.C.C. Plans Vote to Restrict Huawei and ZTE Purchases

F.C.C. Plans Vote to Restrict Huawei and ZTE Purchases

Rural carriers have raised concerns about moves to crack down on Huawei gear, saying it will cut them off from a supply of affordable equipment.
Read the Letter Facebook Employees Sent to Mark Zuckerberg About Political Ads

Read the Letter Facebook Employees Sent to Mark Zuckerberg About Political Ads

Hundreds of Facebook employees signed a letter decrying the decision to let politicians post any claims they wanted — even false ones — in ads on the site.
1.5 Million Packages a Day: The Internet Brings Chaos to N.Y. Streets

1.5 Million Packages a Day: The Internet Brings Chaos to N.Y. Streets

The push for convenience is having a stark impact on gridlock, roadway safety and pollution in New York City and urban areas around the world.
The Advertising Industry Has a Problem: People Hate Ads

The Advertising Industry Has a Problem: People Hate Ads

Ad-blocking consumers and cost-cutting clients make for “dangerous days for advertisers,” according to a new report.

Disney Is New to Streaming, but Its Marketing Is Unmatched

The company’s synergistic approach — think trailers playing on TVs in 22,000 Disney World hotel rooms — has made Disney Plus known to millions.
Period-Tracking Apps Say You May Have a Disorder. What if They’re Wrong?

Period-Tracking Apps Say You May Have a Disorder. What if They’re Wrong?

Apps like Flo and Clue are shifting from just tracking your health data to using it to make evaluations about your health risks. Their tools may not always be accurate.
‘Silicon Valley,’ Darker Than Ever, Captures the Bleak Mood of Tech

‘Silicon Valley,’ Darker Than Ever, Captures the Bleak Mood of Tech

In its final season, the HBO satire asks the big questions: Can good coexist with greed? Does money ruin everything — and how much does that matter, if we’re talking billions?
Growing Meat in a Lab That Doesn’t Look Like Mush

Growing Meat in a Lab That Doesn’t Look Like Mush

In their quest to make a lab-grown steak, researchers devised a form of scaffolding made with gelatin.
Microsoft Wins Pentagon’s $10 Billion JEDI Contract, Thwarting Amazon

Microsoft Wins Pentagon’s $10 Billion JEDI Contract, Thwarting Amazon

Amazon was considered a front-runner for the cloud computing project before President Trump began criticizing the company’s founder, Jeff Bezos.
Don Valentine, Founder of Sequoia Capital, Is Dead at 87

Don Valentine, Founder of Sequoia Capital, Is Dead at 87

Mr. Valentine’s venture capital firm, established in 1972, helped cement Silicon Valley as a hub for technology companies.
The Week in Tech: Google’s Quantum Leap

The Week in Tech: Google’s Quantum Leap

The company can run esoteric calculations on exotic new hardware faster than is possible on a supercomputer. It’s an achievement of little practical use, but still important.
Facebook Calls Truce With Publishers as It Unveils Facebook News

Facebook Calls Truce With Publishers as It Unveils Facebook News

The social network introduced a new section of its mobile app dedicated to news content, offering stories from a mix of publications.

Pentagon, With an Eye on China, Pushes for Help From American Tech

Talks over how U.S. companies can ensure future supplies of advanced computer chips have taken on more urgency.
‘It’s Definitely Pretty Empty’: Why Saving WeWork Will Be Hard

‘It’s Definitely Pretty Empty’: Why Saving WeWork Will Be Hard

While expanding at a breakneck pace, the co-working company has struggled to turn a profit on millions of square feet of office space.
Amazon’s Profit Falls Sharply as Company Buys Growth

Amazon’s Profit Falls Sharply as Company Buys Growth

The company has been investing heavily to keep its giant core businesses growing at the expense of higher profits.
Ingo Maurer, Designer Known as a Poet of Light, Dies at 87

Ingo Maurer, Designer Known as a Poet of Light, Dies at 87

Mr. Maurer’s wonky fascination with technology led to lamps he made out of scribbled memos, tea strainers and incandescent bulbs with feathered wings.