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Foreign Policy: news on page 54

Trump’s Plan to Leave a Major Arms Treaty With Russia Might Actually Be About China

Leaving the agreement clears the way for the U.S. to boost its conventional forces in the Pacific.

The Saudis Are Killing America’s Middle East Policy

Mohammad bin Salman isn’t just ruining his own reputation—he’s spoiling Washington’s policies across the region.

Referendum Redux?

Two years after deciding to leave the European Union, many Brits want a second vote on Brexit.

Can the U.S. Make Oil Sanctions on Iran Work?

Given pushback from friends and foes, Trump’s goal of zero Iranian exports is still far off.

The World’s System for Resettling Refugees Benefits the United States

By dismantling it, Trump would leave the country—and refugees—worse off.

Jamal Khashoggi Had Skin in the Game. The Crown Prince’s Cheerleaders Didn’t.

Too often, Westerners treat courageous local experts like pawns in a political game. The journalist’s murder should serve as a reminder that, for some, writing an op-ed is a deadly risk.

Afghanistan’s Strongman Democracy

Flawed and messy as it was, the vote was still good for democracy.
Cameroon’s Paul Biya Gives a Master Class in Fake Democracy

Cameroon’s Paul Biya Gives a Master Class in Fake Democracy

One of the world’s most experienced autocrats has clinched another seven-year term by bending the rules of the game in his direction in ways both old and new.

Saudi Khashoggi Claims Fall Flat; Riyadh Blindsided; Bolton in Moscow

Everything you need to know about Saudi Arabia’s claim that Khashoggi was killed during a fight inside its Istanbul consulate, the Trump administration’s decision to pull out of a major arms treaty, a

The Taliban Just Won a Key Battle for Afghanistan’s Future

The killing of a strongman police chief creates a dangerous power vacuum.

The Kingdom’s Hackers and Bots

Saudi Arabia is using cutting-edge technology to track dissidents and stifle dissent.

Norwegian Diplomat Tops U.N. Shortlist For Syria Envoy

Geir Pedersen could be saddled with one of diplomacy’s most thankless tasks.

Few Signs of Progress on Denuclearization as U.S., South Korea Cancel Another Major Military Exercise

Current and former U.S. officials say North Korea is dragging its heels, but Seoul and Pyongyang are still talking.

The Tourism Curse

Like a wealth of oil, lots of visitors can become a development trap. Here’s how to avoid it.

The Sad Decline of Brazil’s Political Establishment

Voters are manifesting their profound unhappiness with the status quo. Jair Bolsonaro is the result.
Did Camp David Doom the Palestinians?

Did Camp David Doom the Palestinians?

A new diplomatic history argues that the United States, Egypt, and Israel prevented a Palestinian state from emerging. But leaders such as Yasser Arafat bear much of the blame.

State Department Considering Public Diplomacy Overhaul

The revamp comes as officials debate how to counter Russian and Chinese influence campaigns.

The Trade War Has Claimed Its First Victim

Tariffs from the United States, Canada, China, Mexico, and the EU may have damaged the WTO beyond repair.
South Africa’s First Nations Have Been Forgotten

South Africa’s First Nations Have Been Forgotten

As Pretoria prepares to confront the legacy of colonial and apartheid-era land theft, hardly anyone seems to care about the claims of the country’s earliest inhabitants—the Khoisan.

The United States Is Not Doing Enough to Fight Chinese Influence

Beijing’s authoritarian political warfare demands a strong response.