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PhysOrg: news on page 6

Fouled waters reveal lasting legacy of US mining industry

Every day many millions of gallons of water loaded with arsenic, lead and other toxic metals flow from some of the most contaminated mining sites in the U.S. and into surrounding lakes and streams

Samsung bends over backwards to rev smartphone desire

Samsung on Wednesday is expected to unveil new flagship smartphones including one with a screen that can fold closed like a book as it seeks to boost the moribund market.

App-based delivery men highlight India's growing gig economy

Suraj Nachre works long hours and regularly misses meals but he treasures his job as a driver for a food delivery startup—working in a booming industry that highlights India's expanding apps-based

Air France-KLM more than doubles profits in 2018 despite strikes

Air France-KLM, which was badly hit last year by strikes and management upheaval, reported on Wednesday that its annual net profits rose by 150 percent to 409 million euros ($463 million).

Trump signs 'Space Force' directive

President Donald Trump signed an order Tuesday outlining his vision for a new "Space Force" that could one day become a separate military branch on an equal footing to the Army and Navy.

Northern Red Sea coral reefs may survive a hot, grim future

As the outlook for coral reefs across a warming planet grows grimmer, scientists in Israel have discovered a rare glimmer of hope: The corals of the northern Red Sea may survive, and even thrive, into

Investigators figure out how to block new antibiotic resistance gene

A new antimicrobial-resistance gene, VCC-1, a ß-lactamase gene, has been discovered in benign close relatives of virulent Vibrio cholerae, which causes cholera. Now, a team of Canadian researchers has

New compound could help treat ovarian cancer

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a compound that could be more effective in treating certain cancers than standard chemotherapy.

Darwin's finches don't tell the whole story of avian evolution

The connection between bird diet and skull shape is surprisingly weak for most species according to a new study led by UCL and the Natural History Museum, rewriting our understanding of how ecosystems

Want to learn about dinosaurs? Pick up some Louisiana roadkill

Fossil-hunting can be grueling, but it's usually not gross. Paleontologists typically work with things that have been dead for millions of years, mineralized into rock and no longer smelly. At the end

Former UN leader tours climate adaptation projects in Miami

Former U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon says he's impressed with Miami's efforts to cope with rising sea levels— and he wishes President Donald Trump were paying attention, too.

Weather on Mars: Chilly with a chance of 'dust devils'

If you're planning a trip to Elysium Planitia on Mars, pack a sweater.

Prenatal forest fire exposure stunts children's growth

Forest fires are more harmful than previously imagined, causing stunted growth in children who were exposed to smoke while in the womb, according to new research from Duke University and the National

Jobs vs. death toll: Calculating corporate death penalties

Is there a threshold an entire industry crosses when it does more harm than good? Michigan Technological University researchers set out to examine the question with numbers.

Great disparities exist in how news media cover terror attacks

Terror attacks carried out by Muslims receive on average 357 percent more media coverage than those committed by other groups, according to a University of Alabama researcher's newly published study.

Solar tadpole-like jets seen with NASA'S IRIS add new clue to age-old mystery

Scientists have discovered tadpole-shaped jets coming out of regions with intense magnetic fields on the Sun. Unlike those living on Earth, these "tadpoles"—formally called pseudo-shocks—are made

'Swindon's finished': UK town in shock over Honda plant closure

"It is going to be a disaster," Mary Day warned, capturing the sense of doom that descended on the working class English town of Swindon after Honda announced it was closing its local plant after more

Ford pulls out of S. America truck business, closes Brazil plant

US automaker Ford said Tuesday it was pulling out of the commercial heavy truck business in South America, closing a plant in Brazil employing 2,800 workers that has been operating for half a century.

US airlines to offer non-binary gender options

US carriers will soon offer passengers additional options besides "male" and "female" when they buy tickets, an airlines trade association said Tuesday.

Trump moving closer to goal of creating a Space Force

President Donald Trump is moving closer toward his goal of creating a Space Force, just not as the separate military department he envisioned.