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PhysOrg: news on page 5

Mechanism of iron-based hydrogen bond cleavage revealed

Hydrogen-based fuel cells hold promise for sustainable power generation, but to become practical they need to be more efficient and cost effective. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National

Giving workers a voice improves retention

Giving low-wage workers a "voice" on the job—the ability to communicate concerns to management—was thought to improve employee satisfaction and retention.

New research calls for national database of Indigenous cultural heritage sites in Australia

New research from the Whitlam Institute within Western Sydney University calls for a national database of places of Indigenous historical and cultural significance following revelations that national

Lobster's underbelly is as tough as industrial rubber

Flip a lobster on its back, and you'll see that the underside of its tail is split in segments connected by a translucent membrane that appears rather vulnerable when compared with the armor-like

A polariton filter turns ordinary laser light into quantum light

An international team of researchers led out of Macquarie University has demonstrated a new approach for converting ordinary laser light into genuine quantum light.

Firefly-inspired surfaces improve efficiency of LED lightbulbs

A new type of light-emitting diode lightbulb could one day light homes and reduce power bills, according to Penn State researchers who suggest that LEDs made with firefly-mimicking structures could

Rosetta's comet sculpted by stress

Feeling stressed? You're not alone. ESA's Rosetta mission has revealed that geological stress arising from the shape of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko has been a key process in sculpting the comet's

Total synthesis of marine antitumor agents trabectedin and lurbinectedin

With its vast numbers of different lifeforms, the sea is a largely unexplored source of natural products that could be starting points for new pharmaceuticals, such as the antitumor drugs trabectedin

Ancient 'night' marsupial faced four months of winter darkness

Paleontologists working on a steep river bank in Alaska have discovered fossil evidence of the northernmost marsupial known to science.

As citizen scientists, farmers can make important contributions to climate adaptation

In the context of rapidly evolving climate conditions, a new study by Bioversity International and partners addresses the challenge of climate adaptation in a way that is both scalable and targeted.

Observation of quantized heating in quantum matter

Shaking a physical system typically heats it up, in the sense that the system continuously absorbs energy. When considering a circular shaking pattern, the amount of energy that is absorbed can

Malaysia to end bauxite mining ban despite environment fears

Malaysia will next month lift a ban on bauxite mining that has been in place for three years, a minister said Tuesday, despite warnings the move may cause serious environmental damage.

New Zealand plans new tax for giants like Google, Facebook

New Zealand's government plans a new tax targeting online giants like Google and Facebook that earn plenty of money in the country but pay little tax.

Huawei's founder says world can't live without it

The founder of Chinese telecom giant Huawei has hit back at US efforts to blacklist the company, saying defiantly that the world cannot do without Huawei and its "more advanced" technology.

New Zealand leader says no final decision on using Huawei

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Tuesday that no final decision has been made on whether Huawei equipment can be used in a planned network upgrade.

Scientist who popularized term "global warming" dies at 87

A scientist who raised early alarms about climate change and popularized the term "global warming" has died. Wallace Smith Broecker was 87.

Hot great white sharks could motor but prefer to swim slow

Yuuki Watanabe has always been fascinated by speed and power. As a child, he recalls being transfixed by the raw strength of great white sharks (Carcharadon carcharias). 'They look cool' says

Coal dust turns white snow black in Siberian town

A Siberian coal mining town has gotten a blanket of black snow, a regular occurrence in the region known for high industrial pollution levels.

World's biggest terrestrial carbon sinks are found in young forests

More than half of the carbon sink in the world's forests is in areas where the trees are relatively young—under 140 years old—rather than in tropical rainforests, research at the University of

Climate change makes summer weather stormier yet more stagnant

Climate change is shifting the energy in the atmosphere that fuels summertime weather, which may lead to stronger thunderstorms and more stagnant conditions for midlatitude regions of the Northern