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PhysOrg: news on page 2

Reddit co-founder pushes hard for paternity leave

Alexis Ohanian wants other guys to be jealous of him. Not because he's a multimillionaire venture capitalist. Or because he's married to tennis pro Serena Williams.

Samsung launches folding smartphone, first 5G handset (Update)

Samsung on Wednesday unveiled a smartphone that folds open to be a tablet, becoming the first major manufacturer to offer the feature as it strives to stoke excitement in a slumping market.

Driver hurt by air bag shrapnel as investigation drags on

Nearly four years ago, the U.S. government's highway safety agency began investigating air bag inflators made by ARC Automotive of Tennessee when two people were hit by flying shrapnel after crashes.

In colliding galaxies, a pipsqueak shines bright

In the nearby Whirlpool galaxy and its companion galaxy, M51b, two supermassive black holes heat up and devour surrounding material. These two monsters should be the most luminous X-ray sources in

Royale rumble: 'Apex Legends' smashing 'Fortnite' records

For the first time since its meteoric rise, "Fortnite" is no longer a no-doubt victory royale atop the video game industry.

Neptune's newest, tiniest moon likely piece of bigger one

Neptune's newest and tiniest moon is probably an ancient piece of a much larger moon orbiting unusually close.

Research reveals why the zebra got its stripes

Why do zebras have stripes? A study published in PLOS ONE today takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work.

The medium shapes the message: New communication technologies may bias historical record

The introduction of communication technologies appears to bias historical records in the direction of the content best suited for each technology, according to a study published February 20, 2019 in

Mega experiment shows species interact more towards tropics and lowlands

One of the largest field experiments ever conducted is providing the best evidence yet in support of a key Darwinian theory—that interactions between species are stronger toward the tropics and at

Lack of sleep is not necessarily fatal for flies

Male flies kept awake do not die earlier than those allowed to sleep, leading researchers to question whether sleep, in flies at least, is essential for staying alive.

When does one of the central ideas in economics work?

The concept of equilibrium is one of the most central ideas in economics. It is one of the core assumptions in the vast majority of economic models, including models used by policymakers on issues

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Wutip organizing

Tropical Depression 02W has organized and strengthened into a tropical storm.

Thermally-painted metasurfaces yield perfect light absorbers for high-tech applications

Researchers have discovered that the ancient technique of heating metal to create vibrant colors creates a nanostructured surface that acts as a perfect light absorber. Perfect light

Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps

Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia—one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen

NASA-NOAA satellite looks at large-eyed Tropical Cyclone Oma

Tropical Cyclone Oma is a large hurricane with a big eye. The storm appeared well-organized on satellite imagery as it moved through the Southern Pacific Ocean.

Massive database traces mammal organ development, cell by single cell

The very early days of growth, long before we are born, are a time of incredible development. In a relatively short period of time, we and other mammals create our bodies' dozens of different organs

Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development

A team of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers in Cambridge have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo

Correlated nucleons may solve 35-year-old mystery

A careful re-analysis of data taken at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has revealed a possible link between correlated protons and neutrons in the nucleus and

Nepal social media bill sparks freedom of speech concerns

Nepal's government on Wednesday tabled draft legislation that would impose harsh penalties for "improper" social media posts, igniting concerns it could be used to suppress freedom of speech and

Ingredients for water could be made on surface of moon, a chemical factory

When a stream of charged particles known as the solar wind careens onto the Moon's surface at 450 kilometers per second (or nearly 1 million miles per hour), they enrich the Moon's surface in