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PhysOrg: news on page 1389

Droplet explosion by shock waves, relevant to nuclear medicine

An arrow shooting through an apple, makes for a spectacular explosive sight in slow motion. Similarly, energetic ions passing through liquid droplets induce shock waves, which can fragment the

Felling pines: Doing it sooner rather than later is better for fynbos

Here is some advice for landowners who want to remove pine trees from their properties in the hope of seeing fynbos plants grow there again: if you have any choice in the matter, do so before the

Do dark matter and dark energy exist?

Researchers have hypothesized that the universe contains "dark matter." They have also posited the existence of "dark energy." These two hypotheses account for the movement of stars in galaxies and

Enhancing the quantum sensing capabilities of diamond

Researchers have discovered that dense ensembles of quantum spins can be created in diamond with high resolution using an electron microscopes, paving the way for enhanced sensors and resources for

Male escorts for women, couples demand grows: global survey

A quarter of Australia's 516 male escorts cater to women and couples, a global survey of the 61 countries which host online male escort websites has found.

High yield, protein with soybean gene

Leftovers can be quite valuable. For instance, when soybean seed is crushed and the oil extracted, what's left is called soybean meal. You'll want to save this leftover.

Physicists open the door to the first direct measurement of Berry curvature in solid matter

Berry curvature may not be the most well-known scientific concept, but to many physicists, its direct measurement is something akin to a holy grail.

New X-ray spectroscopy explores hydrogen-generating catalyst

Using a newly developed technique, researchers from Japan, Germany and the U.S. have identified a key step in production of hydrogen gas by a bacterial enzyme. Understanding these reactions could be

Army scientist studies thunderstorms to improve battlefield missions

An Army scientist working at the Army Research Laboratory has discovered a new pattern in the evolution of thunderstorms that can be used to better predict how weather and the environment will affect

New technology will help blind people 'see' at the cinema

Sight loss affects around two million people in the UK, a number that is likely to increase to four million by 2050.

Towards better understanding of railway ballast

SNCF engineers have been using mathematical models for many years to simulate the dynamic behavior of railways. These models have not been able to take into account large portions of the track have

Tax plastic takeaway boxes, the scourge of the oceans

That takeaway box that was in your hands for 10 minutes on Friday night could be in the ocean forever. Single use plastics are a real concern for the planet. The use and throwaway nature of items such

How drones are being used in Zanzibar's fight against malaria

On a typically hot and humid July day in Stonetown, the capital of Zanzibar, a gaggle of children, teenagers and the odd parents watched our small drone take flight. My colleagues Makame Makame,

Bacteria as pacemaker for the intestine

Spontaneous contractions of the digestive tract play an important role in almost all animals, and ensure healthy bowel functions. From simple invertebrates to humans, there are consistently similar

Re-cloning of first cloned dog deemed successful thus far

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Seoul National University, Michigan State University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has re-cloned the first dog to be cloned. In their paper

Third Roman temple in Silchester may have been part of emperor's vanity project

A Roman temple uncovered in a Hampshire farmyard by University of Reading archaeologists may be the first building of its kind in Britain to be dated back to the reign of Emperor Nero.

Tropical Cyclone Information System updated to include new satellite data sets

The Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) is a tool that fuses hurricane models and observations within a web-based system to improve forecasting capabilities. TCIS provides scientists with the

Climate change may be making bearded dragons less intelligent

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with the University of Lincoln in the U.K. has found evidence suggesting that as the planet heats up due to global warming, the bearded dragon may become

White meat or dark meat? Serving up big data to decipher Thanksgiving dinner

For Virginia Tech biochemistry majors Cat Hayes, Duke Nguyen, and Will Stone, turkey has taken on a whole new meaning.

Testing the advantage of being left-handed in sports

(Phys.org)—Sports scientist Florian Loffing with the Institute of Sport Science, University of Oldenburg in Germany has conducted a study regarding the possibility of left-handed athletes having an