The Atlantic: Health

The Rise of Older Mothers

The Rise of Older Mothers

Women in the United States are having children at record low rates, according to the latest statistical release from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2017, births were down 2 percent
The First Urban Case of Ebola in the Congo Is a ‘Game Changer’

The First Urban Case of Ebola in the Congo Is a ‘Game Changer’

Updated on May 17 at 3:54 p.m. ETThe current Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has thus far been confined to remote rural areas, but one case has now been confirmed in Mbandaka, a
Is Salt Bad? A Prison Study May Hold the Answer

Is Salt Bad? A Prison Study May Hold the Answer

There is a lot to fight over in the vagaries of dietary science, but possibly nothing has been as contentious or as longstanding as the salt wars. For decades, public-health officials have pushed
How Income Affects the Brain

How Income Affects the Brain

We often attribute financial problems to bad life decisions: Why didn’t that person stay in college? Why didn’t they pick a more lucrative career? Why did they have so many kids? But several recent
The Wisdom of Running a 2,189-Mile Marathon

The Wisdom of Running a 2,189-Mile Marathon

Of all the things that could have broken Scott Jurek on a 2,189-mile run, it was a small tree root that crushed his spirit. He was 38 days into an attempt to beat the speed record for completing the
The New Ebola Outbreak Could Take 'Three, Maybe Four' Months to Control

The New Ebola Outbreak Could Take 'Three, Maybe Four' Months to Control

The Democratic Republic of Congo is currently fighting its ninth Ebola outbreak—and Jean-Jacques Muyembe Tamfum is as calm as ever. Warm, round-faced, and preternaturally chill, Muyembe was the first
Ebola Returns Just as the White House Loses Its Top Biodefense Expert

Ebola Returns Just as the White House Loses Its Top Biodefense Expert

This week, three things happened with painfully ironic synchronicity. First, the Democratic Republic of the Congo revealed that it is facing down its ninth Ebola outbreak. Second, President Trump
The Burnout Crisis in American Medicine

The Burnout Crisis in American Medicine

During a recent evening on call in the hospital, I was asked to see an elderly woman with a failing kidney. She’d come in feeling weak and short of breath and had been admitted to the cardiology
Protecting Police Dogs From Fentanyl

Protecting Police Dogs From Fentanyl

In October 2016, three dogs in Broward County, Florida, showed symptoms of overdose after they assisted in a federal drug raid. The dogs were more lethargic than usual, and they refused water. In West
In One Year, 57,375 Years of Life Were Lost to Police Violence

In One Year, 57,375 Years of Life Were Lost to Police Violence

People killed by police in 2015 and 2016 had a median age of 35, and they still had an average of about 50 years left to live when they died. It’s this metric—the gap between how long someone lives
The Obesity Cure Is Out of Reach in the Heaviest States

The Obesity Cure Is Out of Reach in the Heaviest States

In Mississippi, more than 37 percent of adults are obese, making it the second-most obese state in the nation. But Mississippi is also one of two states, along with Montana, that doesn’t cover
Elderly Mice's Brains Are Bad at Handling Jet Lag

Elderly Mice's Brains Are Bad at Handling Jet Lag

Strange things happen to sleep as the body ages. For humans, getting older can mean waking up over and over again or shifting to a much earlier wake-up time. In elderly mice, the region in the brain
The Hard-to-Trace Ingredient Behind Skyrocketing Cocaine Deaths

The Hard-to-Trace Ingredient Behind Skyrocketing Cocaine Deaths

Updated on May 3, 2018In the United States, more people are dying because of synthetic drugs like fentanyl than because of heroin or prescribed painkillers. While, to many, the opioid crisis has been
The Problem With Trump Dictating His Own Medical Assessment

The Problem With Trump Dictating His Own Medical Assessment

This has been a tortured administration for doctors. The respective scandals of physicians Tom Price, Ronny Jackson, and Harold Bornstein are raising questions for the profession about how it polices
What Bill Gates Fears Most

What Bill Gates Fears Most

Bill Gates fancies himself an optimist. Global health, he feels, is on an upward trajectory. Childhood deaths are plummeting. Polio is on the verge of eradication.But if there’s one issue that
American Nostalgia on a Bun

American Nostalgia on a Bun

The series Riverdale owes its ratings success to a number of factors, not least of which is its appeal to a relentless and sometimes revisionist nostalgia. The characters are lifted from the classic
The City With the Most Expensive ACA Insurance in the U.S.

The City With the Most Expensive ACA Insurance in the U.S.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.—When Garnett and Dave Mellen sent their 19-year-old daughter, Gita, off to college an hour away at Virginia Commonwealth University last fall, they didn’t expect to follow her.But
23andMe Wants Its DNA Data to Be Less White

23andMe Wants Its DNA Data to Be Less White

23andMe is best known for selling DNA test kits, but the company’s real value lies in the data of its 5 million customers. The bigger its genetic database, the more insights 23andMe can glean from
How Tutus Took Over Runners’ Wardrobes

How Tutus Took Over Runners’ Wardrobes

By mile nine, Kelly Lewis and her friends knew they were on to something. She and her pals Elise Wallace and Carrie Lundell had donned sparkly skirts that Lundell, a seamstress, had whipped up as a
Salad Panic

Salad Panic

These are nervous days for salad enthusiasts. The green, beating heart of the American salad, romaine lettuce, has been ripped from shelves and refrigerators at the insistence of the Centers for