PhysOrg

Invasion of the body-snatching fungus

UConn researchers recently documented in Nature Scientific Reports a gory and fascinating relationship between periodical cicadas and a fungus that infects them, hijacks their behavior, and causes a

Understanding the wetting of micro-textured surfaces can help give them new functionalities

The wetting and adhesion characteristics of solid surfaces critically depend on their fine structures. However, until now, our understanding of exactly how the sliding behaviour of liquid droplets

IBM reveals novel energy-saving optical receiver with a new record of rapid power-on/off time

With the increasing popularization of datacenters and other bandwidth hungry interconnect applications, today's bandwidth growth of short-distance optical networks demands data transmission speeds of

New symmetry-breaking method opens way for bioactive compounds

Many chemical molecules can exist in nature together with their mirror counterparts; like hands, two compounds can be made up of the same atoms in the same overall structure but in opposite

Drier conditions could doom Rocky Mountain spruce and fir trees

Drier summers and a decline in average snowpack over the past 40 years have severely hampered the establishment of two foundational tree species in subalpine regions of Colorado's Front Range,

New insight into how magma feeds volcanic eruptions

A novel research study by scientists at the University of Liverpool has provided new insights into how molten rock (magma) moves through the Earth's crust to feed volcanic eruptions.

Urban heat island effects depend on a city's layout

The arrangement of a city's streets and buildings plays a crucial role in the local urban heat island effect, which causes cities to be hotter than their surroundings, researchers have found. The new

Hauling antiprotons around in a van

A team of researchers working on the antiProton Unstable Matter Annihilation (PUMA) project near CERN's particle laboratory, according to a report in Nature, plans to capture a billion antiprotons,

Novel technology could allow researchers to develop and test new antimalaria drugs

One of the biggest obstacles to eradicating malaria is a dormant form of the parasite that lurks in the livers of some patients. This dormant form is resistant to most antimalarial drugs and can

How bats carry viruses without getting sick

Bats are known to harbor highly pathogenic viruses like Ebola, Marburg, Hendra, Nipah, and SARS-CoV, and yet they do not show clinical signs of disease. In a paper published in the journal Cell Host

Synchronised waves control embryonic patterning

During an embryo's journey from a single cell to a complex organism, countless patterning processes make sure that the right cells develop in exactly the right location and at the right time. Cells

Damage encourages maple species to become female, study finds

A few years ago, Rutgers researcher Jennifer Blake-Mahmud was working on a botany project in Virginia when colleagues pointed out a striped maple, a common tree in the understory of mountain forests

How changes in biotic interactions impact dryland ecosystems

The negative impact of a lack of plant functional diversity on ecosystems is well-documented, and can be seen in action in most dryland ecosystems. However, the indirect effects of biotic interactions

CDN analysis sheds light on internet evolution

CDNs have greatly improved our online experience. The CDN-H project has studied its implications for the internet's structure and the relationship between stakeholders.

New portable, high performance device analyses toxic gases and air pollutants

Against a backdrop of increased concern about the safety of traded cargo across Europe, the EU-funded IRON project has developed a handheld device for sub-parts per billion (ppb) gas detection based

New quantum memory stores information for hours

Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds.

Zero gravity graphene promises success in space

In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space.

Rainfall's natural variation hides climate change signal

New research from The Australian National University (ANU) and ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science suggests natural rainfall variation is so great that it could take a human lifetime

How a zebrafish's squiggly cartilage transforms into a strong spine

In the womb, our strong spines start as nothing more than a rope of rubbery tissue. As our bodies develop, this flexible cord, called the notochord, morphs into a column of bone and cartilage sturdy

Blowing in the wind—picking apart the plastic problem

My son sent me a text this morning from the school bus. "Mum" he said "there's litter everywhere." Of course, he knows my interest in such things…