Science Daily

Laser technology takes Maya archeologists where they've never gone before

With the help of airborne laser mapping technology, a team of archeologists is exploring on a larger scale than ever before the history and spread of settlement at the ancient Maya site of Ceibal in

Locomotion of bipedal dinosaurs might be predicted from that of ground-running birds

A new model based on ground-running birds could predict locomotion of bipedal dinosaurs based on their speed and body size, according to a new study.

Sea urchins erode rock reefs, excavate pits for themselves

Through their grazing activity, sea urchins excavate rock and form the pits they occupy. This activity may cause significant bioerosion of temperate reefs, according to a study published Feb. 21, 2018

Scientists create 'Evolutionwatch' for plants

Using a hitchhiking weed, scientists reveal for the first time the mutation rate of a plant growing in the wild.

Tropical trees use unique method to resist drought

Tropical trees in the Amazon Rainforest may be more drought resistant than previously thought, according to a new study. That's good news, since the Amazon stores about 20 percent of all carbon in the

Securing a child's future needs to start during parents' teen years

A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy -- even going back to adolescence -- according to a new paper.

New interaction mechanism of proteins discovered

Researchers have discovered a previously unknown way in which proteins interact with one another and cells organize themselves. This new mechanism involves two fully unstructured proteins forming an

Novel mechanism behind schizophrenia uncovered

Researchers have uncovered a novel mechanism in which a protein--neuregulin 3--controls how key neurotransmitters are released in the brain during schizophrenia. The protein is elevated in people with

Cross-bred flies reveal new clues about how proteins are regulated

The investigators used a technique called bottom-up proteomics (sometimes called shotgun proteomics) to reveal which proteins of each species were present in the hybrid flies.

Tomatoes of the same quality as normal, but using only half the water

When reducing the water used to water cherry tomato crops by more than 50%, the product not only maintains its quality, both commercially and nutritionally, but it also even increases the level of

In a first, tiny diamond anvils trigger chemical reactions by squeezing

Scientists have turned the smallest possible bits of diamond and other super-hard specks into 'molecular anvils' that squeeze and twist molecules until chemical bonds break and atoms exchange

Copper Age Iberians 'exported' their culture -- but not their genes -- all over Europe

Prehistoric Iberians 'exported' their culture throughout Europe, reaching Great Britain, Sicily, Poland and all over central Europe in general. However, they did not export their genes. The Beaker

Getting sleepy? Fruit flies constantly tune into environmental temperature to time sleep

Humans and fruit flies may have not shared a common ancestor for hundreds of millions of years, but the neurons that govern our circadian clocks are strikingly similar.

Ancient DNA tells tales of humans' migrant history

Fueled by advances in analyzing DNA from the bones of ancient humans, scientists have dramatically expanded the number of samples studied -- revealing vast and surprising migrations and genetic mixing

Ancient-DNA researchers surpass the 1,000-genome milestone

In the last eight years, the field of ancient DNA research has expanded from just one ancient human genome to more than 1,300. The latest 625 of those genomes debut Feb. 21 in Nature, including the

Theory suggests root efficiency, independence drove global spread of flora

Researchers suggest that plants spread worldwide thanks to root adaptations that allowed them to become more efficient and independent. As plant species spread, roots became thinner so they could more

Amateur astronomer captures rare first light from massive exploding star

First light from a supernova is hard to capture; no one can predict where and when a star will explode. An amateur astronomer has now captured on film this first light, emitted when the exploding core

First evidence of surprising ocean warming around Galápagos corals

A new analysis of the natural temperature archives stored in coral reefs shows the ocean around the Galápagos Islands has been warming since the 1970s. The finding surprised the research team, because

Unexpected discovery about essential enzyme

The enzyme that produces DNA building blocks plays an important role when cells divide. In a new study, researchers have discovered for the first time that the so-called master switch of the enzyme

Film Memento helped uncover how the brain remembers and interprets events from clues

In the Christopher Nolan film Memento (2000) the protagonist suffers from long-term memory loss and is unable to retain new memories for no longer than a few minutes. The events unfold in reversed