Freakonomics

Not Your Grandmother’s I.M.F.

Not Your Grandmother’s I.M.F.

Season 7, Episode 24 This week on Freakonomics Radio: The International Monetary Fund has long been the “lender of last resort” for economies in crisis. Christine Lagarde, who runs the institution,
After the Glass Ceiling, a Glass Cliff

After the Glass Ceiling, a Glass Cliff

Only 5 percent of Fortune 500 companies are run by women. Why? Research shows that female executives are more likely to be put in charge of firms that are already in crisis. Are they being set up to
It’s Your Problem Now

It’s Your Problem Now

No, it’s not your fault the economy crashed. Or that consumer preferences changed. Or that new technologies have blown apart your business model. But if you’re the C.E.O., it is your problem. So what
What Can Uber Teach Us About the Gender Pay Gap?

What Can Uber Teach Us About the Gender Pay Gap?

Season 7, Episode 23 This week on Freakonomics Radio: The gig economy offers the ultimate flexibility to set your own hours. That’s why economists thought it would help eliminate the gender pay gap. A
An Egghead’s Guide to the Superbowl (Rebroadcast)

An Egghead’s Guide to the Superbowl (Rebroadcast)

We assembled a panel of smart dudes — a two-time Super Bowl champ; a couple of N.F.L. linemen, including one who’s getting a math Ph.D at M.I.T., and our resident economist — to tell you what to watch
“I Wasn’t Stupid Enough to Say This Could Be Done Overnight”

“I Wasn’t Stupid Enough to Say This Could Be Done Overnight”

Indra Nooyi became C.E.O. of PepsiCo just in time for a global financial meltdown. She also had a portfolio full of junk food just as the world decided that junk food is borderline toxic. Here’s the
Are We Running Out of Ideas?

Are We Running Out of Ideas?

Season 7, Episode 21 Economists have a hard time explaining why productivity growth has been shrinking. This week on Freakonomics Radio, Stephen J. Dubner examines one theory: that true innovation has
How to Become a C.E.O.

How to Become a C.E.O.

Mark Zuckerberg’s dentist dad was an early adopter of digital x-rays. Jack Welch blew the roof off a factory. Carol Bartz was a Wisconsin farm girl who got into computers. No two C.E.O.’s have the
Evolution, Accelerated (Rebroadcast)

Evolution, Accelerated (Rebroadcast)

Season 7, Episode 20 This week on Freakonomics Radio: Stephen J. Dubner explores a breakthrough in genetic technology that has given humans more power than ever to change nature. So what happens next?
What Does a C.E.O. Actually Do?

What Does a C.E.O. Actually Do?

They’re paid a fortune — but for what, exactly? What makes a good C.E.O. — and how can you even tell? Is “leadership science” a real thing — or just airport-bookstore mumbo jumbo? We put these
Why Is the Live-Event Ticket Market So Screwed Up?

Why Is the Live-Event Ticket Market So Screwed Up?

Season 7, Episode 19 This week on Freakonomics Radio: The public has almost no chance to buy good tickets to the best events. Ticket brokers, meanwhile, make huge profits on the secondary markets.
How to Be a Modern Democrat — and Win

How to Be a Modern Democrat — and Win

Gina Raimondo, the governor of tiny Rhode Island, has taken on unions, boosted big business, and made friends with Republicans. She is also one of just 15 Democratic governors in the country. Would
How to Launch a Behavior-Change Revolution

How to Launch a Behavior-Change Revolution

Season 7, Episode 18 This week on Freakonomics Radio: Academic studies are nice, and so are Nobel Prizes. But to truly prove the value of a new idea, you have to unleash it to the masses. That’s what
Why Is My Life So Hard? (Rebroadcast)

Why Is My Life So Hard? (Rebroadcast)

Most of us feel we face more headwinds and obstacles than everyone else — which breeds resentment. We also undervalue the tailwinds that help us — which leaves us ungrateful and unhappy. How can we
Could Solving This One Problem Solve All the Others? (Rebroadcast)

Could Solving This One Problem Solve All the Others? (Rebroadcast)

Season 7, Episode 17 This week on Freakonomics Radio: the biggest problem with humanity is humans themselves. Too often, we make choices — what we eat, how we spend our money and time — that undermine
Trust Me (Rebroadcast)

Trust Me (Rebroadcast)

Societies where people trust one another are healthier and wealthier. In the U.S. (and the U.K. and elsewhere), social trust has been falling for decades — in part because our populations are more
Should We Really Behave Like Economists Say We Do? (Rebroadcast)

Should We Really Behave Like Economists Say We Do? (Rebroadcast)

Season 7, Episode 12 You have perhaps come across the phrase homo economicus, which describes a model for human behavior as seen through the lens of economics. In this hour, you’ll hear Freakonomics
Is America Ready for a “No-Lose Lottery”? (Update)

Is America Ready for a “No-Lose Lottery”? (Update)

Most people don’t enjoy the simple, boring act of putting money in a savings account. But we do love to play the lottery. So what if you combine the two, creating a new kind of savings account with a
An Astronaut, a Catalan, and Two Linguists Walk Into a Bar…: TMSIDK Episode 36

An Astronaut, a Catalan, and Two Linguists Walk Into a Bar…: TMSIDK Episode 36

Why New York has skinny skyscrapers, how to weaponize water, and what astronauts talk about in space. John McWhorter is co-host; Bari Weiss is live fact-checker. The post An Astronaut, a Catalan, and
Why Doesn’t Everyone Get the Flu Vaccine?

Why Doesn’t Everyone Get the Flu Vaccine?

Season 7, Episode 11 This week on Freakonomics Radio: what if there were a small step you could take that would prevent you from getting sick, stop you from missing work, and help ensure you won’t