Five Ways To Create An Impressionable Business Card

Design Taxi

Image via Sarah Ferrari

If your business card isn’t bringing clients to your door, it isn’t working hard enough on your behalf.

Maximize the potential of your card with these five tips:
Arouse curiosity or positive emotions about the brand


Image via Sarah Ferrari


Image via Sarah Ferrari

Your business card should persuade a call-to-action. Simply stating contacts will not generate much interest. Pique the reader’s curiosity by providing interesting or amusing facts about the brand.

These pieces of bite-sized information can incite laughter or delight. When a positive emotion is evoked in the reader, it often makes the brand appear more affable and welcoming.

Take for instance London-based graphic designer Sarah Ferrari. She pokes fun at her last name in this witty business card, pictured above, that addresses what people often think about when introduced to her full name.
Double your card as a portfolio


Image via Andrew DePaula


Image via Andrew DePaula

Enabling consumers to trial the brand’s goods or services will bring them one step closer to becoming regular customers.

Brands that offer services can print a promotion code on the card for users. Samples of products can also be tucked away inside or attached to the business card.

For designers and artists, include thumbnail previews of your best and most relevant work. Giving clients a taste of your creativity will leave them referring to your online portfolio for more samples.

Alternatively, you can turn to the swivelCard–designed by engineer Andrew DePaula–for inspiration. This clever card includes a USB drive that allows the owner to share relevant photos, videos and websites with its recipients.
Double your card as a handy tool



Image via ReThink Canada


Image via ReThink Canada

Business cards that are odd-shaped for the sake of design do not always bode well with recipients. It can be difficult to keep inside a wallet and might even encourage disposal of the contact piece.

Design must be smart and benefit the user. For example, Rethink Canada crafted this clever business card for Broke Bike Alley that doubles as a tool for the brand’s target market–bicycle riders.

In this case, the metallic card material is justified because it maintains the card’s durability. Users can keep the pragmatic device conveniently in his or her wallet.
Creates an interactive experience


Image via Cardonizer


Image via Cardonizer

Including an activity with the card can make potential clients feel more involved with the brand. Better yet, an interactive experience that benefits the user will make your brand more memorable.

South Korea’s Black Pearl Creative designed this handy self-optometry business card for its client that let’s receivers examine their own eyesight. The card not only worked within the advertiser’s limited budget, but also helps recipients acknowledge that they might need an eye checkup.
Include only vital information


Image via Warren They


Image via Warren They

Be selective about the content of your card. From the users point of view, he or she will often refer to the most convenient means of contact–telephone and email. For a quick preview of work, Instagram or a website often serves best.

Designer Warren They created a simple, to-the-point business card for filmmaker Martin Hong in time for his debut at an international film festival. All that was included on the promotional material was Hong’s name, occupation, telephone number, email and website address.

While the inclusion of QR codes on cards is nothing new, users who do not have a QR code reader can be easily put off by having to download an additional app. Bear in mind–convenience for the user is vital.
This feature is made possible by Gotprint.com.
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